D-CODE logo

D-CODE

Can Vitamin D Supplementation in Patients with Crohn's Disease Improve Symptoms as an Adjunct Therapy: ViDs Feasibility Study

D-CODE

Can Vitamin D Supplementation in Patients with Crohn's Disease Improve Symptoms as an Adjunct Therapy: ViDs Feasibility Study
Funding National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) through a Clinical Doctoral Research Fellowship
Portfolio Clinical Specialties
Interventions Medicine
Randomised Yes
Status Recruiting
Start Date 01-May-2018

About half to three-quarters of people with Crohn’s Disease may develop vitamin D deficiency (very low levels of vitamin D in the body). Vitamin D is very important in helping to maintain healthy bones. But research has found that for people with Crohn’s Disease, having normal levels of vitamin D might also help to improve the symptoms of their disease. Despite this vitamin D levels are not routinely checked for people with Crohn's Disease.

There are many different doses and types of vitamin D available on prescription and over the counter but there is no standard treatment for vitamin D deficiency in Crohn's Disease.

The Vitamin D Screening Study will help us to:


•Understand what proportion of people with Crohn's Disease has vitamin D deficiency at the end of the winter and in the summer.
•Understand any specific factors that might contribute to vitamin D deficiency in people with Crohn's Disease.
•Identify people who may wish to join the second part of our research study.


We are hoping to screen 250 patients to check their vitamin D levels. We will then screen 50 patients at a different time of the year to compare vitamin D levels during different seasons.

The Vitamin D Supplementation study will help us to determine:


•If it is possible to carry out the study with a large number of people to see which dose of vitamin D is best at treating vitamin D deficiency in people with Crohn's Disease.
•How many people we would need in a large study to give us the most reliable results.


We are aiming to recruit 50 people in to the supplementation study at this point.

Publications

  • n/a